Tag Archives: #fibre #prebiotic

Kohlrabi – How do you eat this unique veggie?

kohlrabi soup 4Kohlrabi is tender, crunchy vegetable, a cousin of cabbage and turnip. Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C and is also a good source of fibre which can help keep you regular, lower your cholesterol and control your blood sugar. It’s great tasting raw and cooked! Be sure to peel the rough skin of the bulb before eating, and you can use the leaves like any other green leafy veg. It’s a favourite in our family and here are some ways we enjoy kohlrabi most:

Raw – Kohlrabi adds a lot of crunch and a bit of a kick to dishes. Peel kohlrabi bulbs and then slice, chop or grate. For a veggie snack cut kohlrabi into sticks & serve with a hummus dip, for salads and slaws chop finely or grate.

Cooked – bake, steam or boil as you would with other veggies.  My family loves soups and Kohlrabi soup is favourite. Here is my version of using this fresh veggie for taste and nutrition boost:

Kohlrabi Soup (makes 4 servings)

kohlrabi soup 1

  • 4 kohlrabi bulbs (500 g) peeled and diced small
  • 1 cup kohlrabi leaves finely chopped
  • 1 onion chopped
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 3 1/2 – 4 cups ( ~1 liter) water or unsalted vegetable broth
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • hot red pepper flakes, ground black pepper and salt to taste
  1. Peel kohlrabi and onion, dice into small (1 cm cubes)
  2. Wash Kohlrabi leaves well and chop finely
  3. Heat oil in a medium size pot
  4. Add onion and kohlrabi to pot and sauté for 3 minutes, stirring continuously
  5. Add kohlrabi greens saute for 2 more minutes
  6. Cover vegetables with water (or unsalted broth) and bring them to a boil. Cover and simmer until the kohlrabi is tender
  7. Season with chopped parsley, hot red pepper flakes, ground black pepper and salt to taste

Did you know NEW nutrition facts table formats will be appearing on Canadian packaged foods soon? Since we develop nutrition facts tables for clients, we wanted to show you what they look like using this Kohlrabi Soup recipe as an example. See the Nutrition Facts Table below. Notice the prominence of calories and the explanation of  % Daily Values – where 5% is a little and 15 % is a lot.  Our Kohlrabi soup, per 250ml serving is only 60 calories and gives you 4 grams of fibre (13% of the daily value) making it a good source fibre!  A serving of this soup is also an excellent source of Vitamin A and C. Enjoy it for taste and good health! What’s your favourite way to eat kohlrabi? Share your recipes here.

kohlrabi soup NFT

 

 

 

Health Canada Consultations – Let your voice be heard ( NEW OPEN till August 14)

Now is THE time to let your voice be heard about food, nutrition, way of eating and sustainability! We know this comes just before summer vacations, but consider that the policies formed following these three consultations will influence how Canadians hear about food, nutrition and sustainability for years to come.

Health Canada chose Dietitians of Canada annual conference on June 9th to announce the latest federal food and nutrition consultations. As part of the Healthy Eating Strategy, there are 3 public consultations live/on-line now and more are expected in the Fall. Please contact us if you have any questions about what this means to you and your business.

Here is a bird’s eye view of what the consultations are about. We encourage you to let your voice be heard and complete these surveys that will help shape the future of nutrition in Canada.

Canada’s Food Guide Consultation (Phase 2)

Food guide cropped consult'n banner N4NN June 2017

Health Canada is revising Canada’s Food Guide to strengthen its recommendations for healthy eating. This is the second round of consultations that is built on what the government heard from 20,000 Canadians who responded to the first round of consultations in 2016.  If you are using healthy eating recommendations for yourself and others you care about, or to help others through your work, we encourage you to complete the survey and join the discussion. This is your chance to weigh in on key issues related to healthy eating and provide input on the new healthy eating recommendations.

http://www.foodguideconsultation.ca/ EXTENDED open till August 14, 2017.

Marketing to Kids

No ads to kids N4NN June 2017
Image Source Health Canada
Health Canada wants to reduce how much advertising children see or hear about unhealthy food and beverages. “This is a complicated subject so before action can be taken, some questions need to be answered, such as what we mean by unhealthy food and what kind of advertising should be allowed. Your ideas and opinions will help Health Canada decide how to go about restricting advertising for unhealthy food and beverages to children. This consultation document is available online between June 10 and EXTENDED till August 14, 2017.”[1]

https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/programs/consultation-restricting-unhealthy-food-and-beverage-marketing-to-children.html

[1] Health Canada (2017) Restricting unhealthy food and beverage marketing to children

Canada’s Food Policy

Food Policy N4NN newsletter June 2017

Food matters to Canadians. We “make choices every day about food that directly impacts our health, environment, and communities.” Agriculture Canada would like to help put more affordable, safe, healthy, food on tables across the country, while protecting the environment. This policy will cover the entire food system and you may have heard of the concept as ‘Farm to Fork’. An online survey is now open at www.canada.ca/food-policy and we encourage you to share your views that will help shape Canada’s food policy. Online consultations is open until July 27, 2017

 

Savory granola bars with ancient herbs

Be adventurous with food! These savory granola bars are super trendy with ancient herbs such as rosemary and thyme, and are tailored for gut-health.  Created with Chef Eric Deletroz  this health-booster recipe is high in fibre, easy to make and tastes GREAT! Presented at the 2016 Digestive Health Summit in Toronto to healthcare professionals and consumers these unique on the go bars were a hit and are ready to fill your hunger gap too. Enjoy!

gut health digestive health recipe 2016

Try one today:www.CDHF.ca/GutBoosterRecipes
http://ow.ly/d/5BpO

Prebiotics – Feed your fibre famished gut

gut health 2017

Canadians are fibre famished! On average we get only HALF of the recommended 25 to 38 grams of fibre per day. Most people could benefit from increasing their fiber intake, and to help maintain gut health focus on including foods that contain fibres that are also prebiotics.

What is a prebiotic? 

Prebiotics are a type of food, mostly fibre that is beneficial for our good gut bacteria. Prebiotics provide fuel for good bacteria which live in our gut to support health.

NOT ALL fibres are pre-biotic!  Probiotics are ingredients that naturally contain food for healthy gut bacteria.  To be classified as a prebiotic, the fibre must[1]:

  1. ESCAPE digestion (pass through the stomach undigested) and
  2. Be able to be FERMENTED by the bacteria in the gut
  3. Stimulate the growth and/or activity of certain ‘good’ bacteria in the large intestine.

Which foods are naturally high in prebiotics?

Dietary fibre classified as having high prebiotic effects includes inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides (fructans , FOS) and galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS).  See below for examples of foods that are naturally high in prebiotics.

 

Examples of foods that are naturally high in prebiotics[2]
Vegetables: Jerusalem artichokes, chicory, garlic, onion, leek, shallots, spring onion, asparagus, beetroot, fennel bulb, green peas, snow peas, sweetcorn, savoy cabbage
Legumes: Chickpeas, lentils, red kidney beans, baked beans, soybeans
Fruit: Custard apples, nectarines, white peaches, persimmon, tamarillo, watermelon, rambutan, grapefruit, pomegranate.  Dried fruit (eg. dates, figs)
Bread/cereals/snacks: Barley, rye bread, rye crackers, pasta, gnocchi, couscous, wheat bran, wheat bread, oats
Nuts and seeds: Cashews, pistachio nuts

 

[1] Krause 2017 & MedMonash.Edu

[2] MedMonash.Edu