Tag Archives: recipes

Kohlrabi – How do you eat this unique veggie?

kohlrabi soup 4Kohlrabi is tender, crunchy vegetable, a cousin of cabbage and turnip. Kohlrabi is an excellent source of vitamin C and is also a good source of fibre which can help keep you regular, lower your cholesterol and control your blood sugar. It’s great tasting raw and cooked! Be sure to peel the rough skin of the bulb before eating, and you can use the leaves like any other green leafy veg. It’s a favourite in our family and here are some ways we enjoy kohlrabi most:

Raw – Kohlrabi adds a lot of crunch and a bit of a kick to dishes. Peel kohlrabi bulbs and then slice, chop or grate. For a veggie snack cut kohlrabi into sticks & serve with a hummus dip, for salads and slaws chop finely or grate.

Cooked – bake, steam or boil as you would with other veggies.  My family loves soups and Kohlrabi soup is favourite. Here is my version of using this fresh veggie for taste and nutrition boost:

Kohlrabi Soup (makes 4 servings)

kohlrabi soup 1

  • 4 kohlrabi bulbs (500 g) peeled and diced small
  • 1 cup kohlrabi leaves finely chopped
  • 1 onion chopped
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 3 1/2 – 4 cups ( ~1 liter) water or unsalted vegetable broth
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • hot red pepper flakes, ground black pepper and salt to taste
  1. Peel kohlrabi and onion, dice into small (1 cm cubes)
  2. Wash Kohlrabi leaves well and chop finely
  3. Heat oil in a medium size pot
  4. Add onion and kohlrabi to pot and sauté for 3 minutes, stirring continuously
  5. Add kohlrabi greens saute for 2 more minutes
  6. Cover vegetables with water (or unsalted broth) and bring them to a boil. Cover and simmer until the kohlrabi is tender
  7. Season with chopped parsley, hot red pepper flakes, ground black pepper and salt to taste

Did you know NEW nutrition facts table formats will be appearing on Canadian packaged foods soon? Since we develop nutrition facts tables for clients, we wanted to show you what they look like using this Kohlrabi Soup recipe as an example. See the Nutrition Facts Table below. Notice the prominence of calories and the explanation of  % Daily Values – where 5% is a little and 15 % is a lot.  Our Kohlrabi soup, per 250ml serving is only 60 calories and gives you 4 grams of fibre (13% of the daily value) making it a good source fibre!  A serving of this soup is also an excellent source of Vitamin A and C. Enjoy it for taste and good health! What’s your favourite way to eat kohlrabi? Share your recipes here.

kohlrabi soup NFT

 

 

 

2017 Top food and nutrition trends

2017’s top 10 fowhat's hotod and nutrition trends signal big changes for the year ahead and include a renewed focus on quality and enjoyment of food, sustainability, clean eating and influential new regulations. Read on for more of our expert advice on trends that will impact consumer food choices. Let us know what you think…

1. Clean Eating
Consumers demand to know exactly what is in their food and where it comes from so they can make informed choices that are in line with their values. For mindful decisions, the ingredient list, the food source and recipe composition are all becoming more significant factors.

2. Kids & Youth
Health Canada identified promoting the importance of healthy eating in children and youth a priority. Look for more resources, reports and dietary guidance to help establish healthy eating habits at an early age.

3. Enjoy food in the company of others
Food is a powerful way to connect with people which has benefits well beyond nutrition. We’ll see focus on bringing back the pleasure of everyday shared meals, cooking and conversation.

4. Sustainability
Taking care of the planet is a priority with a strong millennial focus. Look for ways to eliminate food waste, use up less than perfect looking fruit/veg, eat food before it spoils, package in compostable or biodegradable materials.

5. Protein Power
Protein continues to be a nutrient of great interest at every meal occasion, especially breakfast. Expect increased attention to plant based protein sources in healthy recipes such as tofu, nuts, seeds, pulses (dried beans, peas, lentils and chickpeas).

6. Food Security
Let’s recognize the importance of equitable access to affordable, wholesome, healthy foods and drinks for all Canadians. Supporting best health through good nutrition for everyone is driving a variety of new efforts.

7. Veggie Believers
Growth of vegetarian, vegan and other plant-focused foods are fueled by consumers looking for ways to boost their veggie intake at home and while eating out. Find more ways to make half your plate veggies.

8. Digestive Health – Feed Your Fiber Famished Gut!
Keeping your gut healthy involves eating probiotics that feed the friendly bacteria that live in your intestine. Canadians get less than half of the daily recommended amount of fibre, so look for more tips on boosting fibre intake, specifically probiotic type fibres for digestive health. More information is available on probiotic fibres at http://bit.ly/2jPasvW 

9. New Food Labels and Claims
Health Canada through a commitment to transparency and ongoing regulatory modernization is revamping the packaged food label and Canada’s Food Guide. Calories, sugars, fat are focus on packaged foods and calories are required on restaurant chain menus. Check CFIA guidelines for any statements that may be made about the nutritional value of foods or menu items to help you avoid any violations.

10. Dietitians are Most Trusted Experts in Food & Nutrition
Many Canadians get their food and nutrition information from the ‘Wild Wild Web” of the internet which has so much misinformation. Instead, look to dietitians, the most trusted experts in food and nutrition. We do the hard work of studying the evidence, reviewing the research and translating the science to credible recommendations that you can use.

Let’s start a conversation! Join me at  our 10th annual Nutrition for NON-Nutritionists Course  on April 26th 2017 University of Toronto

Savory granola bars with ancient herbs

Be adventurous with food! These savory granola bars are super trendy with ancient herbs such as rosemary and thyme, and are tailored for gut-health.  Created with Chef Eric Deletroz  this health-booster recipe is high in fibre, easy to make and tastes GREAT! Presented at the 2016 Digestive Health Summit in Toronto to healthcare professionals and consumers these unique on the go bars were a hit and are ready to fill your hunger gap too. Enjoy!

gut health digestive health recipe 2016

Try one today:www.CDHF.ca/GutBoosterRecipes
http://ow.ly/d/5BpO

How to Cook Perfect Green Veggies – make ahead 2 step blanching method

green-veg-cook-recipeHere is my secret tip for tasty make ahead vibrant green veggies. It’s called blanching – where the veggies are placed briefly into boiling water then removed and plunged into an ice bath that stops the cooking. Blanching is a terrific preparation method to partially cook veggies making them a bit softer and removing any strong taste without compromising nutrition. You can serve blanched veggies directly or keep them in the fridge for up to 5 days. Use blanched veggies as salad boosters or reheat for a quick dinner side dish. It’s also a terrific pot luck dinner contribution where you prep ahead at home, store in fridge and upon arrival at the host’s home you only need to reheat briefly for a healthy and tasty side dish.

  1. Boil a large pot of water (you can add 2 Tbsp lemon juice to the water for flavour boost). Prepare your ice water bath and a dish with a tea towel to dry the veggies. (see pictures top row)
  2. Wash and clean you green veggies.
  3. Drop a small batch of veggies into boiling water for 2 min (3 min max. if you must). Repeat steps below until all your veggies are blanched.
  4. Take out veggies from boiling water using long handle tongs or slotted spoon & toss them into ice water bath for a few minutes to stop the cooking.
  5. Remove cooled veggies from ice bath, shake out water and place them on clean tea towel to dry.
  6. Place all your blanched veggies in a covered container and store in the fridge for up to 5 days.
  7. Enjoy cold in salads or reheat on stove top in a pan with 1 Tbsp vegetable oil. Top with toasted almonds for a tasty and nutritious side dish.

Bon appétit

Be Good to Your Gut

gut-health-n4nn-2016-jpgJoin us at the Microbiota Summit on Nov 7th!
RD Lucia Weiler teams up with Chef Eric Deletroz to dish out healthy advice, one bite at a time!

Two out of three Canadians experience digestive health problems every year.  For some people it’s just uncomfortable for a while, but for others it’s a chronic, painful or even life threatening condition. Researchers are looking at ways to keep your gut healthy and are discovering the significant impact of microorganisms that call your gut home.

Did know your body is home to trillions of microorganisms? The human gut in fact has its own microorganism colonies made up of mainly bacteria that are living and working in your body to help keep you healthy. Gut microorganisms are an exciting leading area of research and we are seeing the emergence of a movement on how gut microorganisms impact lifelong health.

On Monday Nov 7th, 2017, the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation (CDHF) is hosting a special education summit on gut health in Toronto for professionals and consumers. Registered Dietitian Lucia Weiler will be teaming up with Chef Eric Deletroz at the event to showcase healthy eating and cooking tips to improve your gut health. Our session will help you discover what to eat for digestive health & how to feed the microorganism world within you. Join us to learn more!

To register for the Microbiota Summit:

  1. Health Care Professional Session: Discover the World Within – Understanding how the Human Microbiota Impacts lifelong health.12:30-5:30 pm in Toronto. Design Exchange, Toronto, Ontario.http://cdhf.ca/en/events/microbiota-summit-for-health-care-professionals
  2.  Consumer directed education session “Healthy Gut Summit’ is also available to help Canadians attain – and maintain — a happy, healthy gut. The session is FREE, but registration is required.http://cdhf.ca/en/events/healthy-gut-summit  Mon. Nov 7. 2016 | 7 – 9pm | Design Exchange Centre | Toronto, Ontario

5 hot tips to help you make small changes that stick #NutritionMonth

Nutrition Month 2016Working as a registered dietitian in education and nutrition communications gives me a unique perspective of seeing the difference nutrition professionals can make. Focusing on one meal a day during Nutrition Month 2016 is a great approach to make changes that you can stick with. Here are my top 5 picks to can help you make small lasting changes – one tip at a time.

  1. Fat confusion reigns
    Misinformation continues to surround dietary fat. People are muddled about the relationship between dietary fat and chronic diseases, so Nutrition Month is a great opportunity to help clarify the message. Saturated fat landscape is changing but it’s NOT a free for all – check food source first. Dietitian’s TIP: All liquid veg oils are OK – pick your favourite to cook with.
  1. Sugars slip up
    Added or free sugars are in the public ‘Danger Zone’. It’s true we don’t need added sugars as part of a healthy diet but it’s important to know that sugars can enhance the taste, aroma and texture of many healthy foods. There are natural sugars found in all fruit, dairy, and wholegrain breads and cereals, foods that are important for our health. Did you know that added and naturally occurring sugars are broken down the same way, and once digested the body really can’t tell the difference?  Dietitian’s Tip: It’s a good start to cut down on sugary foods but it’s still okay to leave some sweet foods in to keep it real.
  1. Veggie Believers
    Increasing your veggie intake is a great step toward healthier eating. In my wellness classes I look for unique and memorable ways reinforce the importance of eating more veggies. See if you can find inspiration in this perennial hit “I’m a Veggie Believer,” music video by Carl Winter, UC Davis.  More great ideas on how to make it easier for you to boost your veggie and fruit intake are available at Half Your Plate a program. Dietitian’s Tip:  Find ways to boost your veggie intake and stick with it.
  1. Worksite wellness works
    According to a poll by Ipsos Reid, 45% of Canadians say that eating healthy meals and snacks while at work is challenging.  You can help kick-start mindful healthy eating at your workplace! Invite a Registered Dietitian (RD) for a lunch and learn session or find an RD in your area for consultation. (Your healthcare benefit package may cover the costs too!)  RDs are the only regulated health professionals in the field of nutrition. Dietitians are qualified to offer you trust-worthy, science-based food and nutrition advice tailored to your health goals, preferences, and lifestyle. Dietitians Tip: Working with a Registered Dietitian (RD) makes a difference!
  1. Cook!
    You probably love to hear it when something you already do is good for you. Well here is one – if you cook you’re good to go! Knowing your way around the kitchen with some cooking skills will set you up for success in health, and you’ll never be without friends when food is a way to show your love and caring for others. The health benefits of cooking your food are real (even if you are using some processed ingredients). Dietitians Tip: Try recipes approved by dietitians to inspire healthy eating you can stick with. Visit  Cookspiration, Dietitian Recipe Ideas or try some of my favourite recipes.

Thanks for reading and Happy Nutrition Month!
Lucia

Orange and Cucumber Navy Bean Salad

2016 is the year of PULSES (dry peas, beans, lentils, chickpeas) Eating pulses is easy, delicious, good for you and good for the planet. Find more recipes, information and ways to get involved at www.pulsepledge.com

pulse recipe 2016 salad

Baking is Back!

bake it up cover page

It’s holiday season and we’re gearing up to celebrate with family and friends. There is nothing like a special treat of baked goodies to signal festive cheer.  Bakers know the real joy of making tasty food that brings sparkle to any occasion and helps create special memories. You may be wondering what baking recipes fit into a healthy diet. Here is a terrific resource titled Bake It Up! – a recipe book for parents and children for making baked goods that meet even the strict requirements of the  Ministry of Education’s School Food and Beverage Policy.  If you love baking give these recipes a try and see how they might fit into your healthy way of eating.

Download and print your free copy of Bake It Up! http://www.eatrightontario.ca/EatRightOntario/media/ERO_PDF/en/School/Bake_It_Up_final.pdf

Simply Cook and Enjoy!

best bean salad pictureMarch in Nutrition Month and dietitians across Canada are celebrating by cooking with you! We know it can be challenging to prepare nutritious meals and snacks day in and day out, so Nutrition Month 2014 is here to help.  On the nutritionmonth.ca  website and in the book COOK! you will find recipes, eating tips, resources and more to make wholesome coming a part of our family’s daily routine.

For your inspiration, here is one of my favourite quotes and recipes. Enjoy!

“The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you’ve got to have a what-the-hell attitude.” Julia Child

Best Bean Salad by Lucia Weiler, RD as published in COOK! by Dietitians of Canada

Canned beans are a time saver and work very well in this dish.

2               large tomatoes, chopped
1               can (540 mL/19 oz.) mixed bean medley, drained and rinsed
¼   cup     finely sliced red or greeen onion
¼   cup     chopped fresh cilantro
2   tbsp     chopped fresh basil

Dressing

1               clove garlic, minced
¼   tsp      hot pepper flakes
¼   tsp      freshly ground black pepper
Pinch        salt
1 ½ tbsp   extra virgin olive oil
2   tsp       balsamic vinegar
1   tsp      freshly squeezed lemon juice

  1. In a medium bowl, combine tomatoes, bean medley, red onion, cilantro and basil
  2. Dressing: In a small bowl, whisk together garlic, hot pepper flakes, black pepper, salt, oil, vinegar and lemon juice
  3. Pour dressing over bean mixture and toss gently to coat. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, until chilled, or for up to 1 day.

Makes 6 servings

Tip:      Be sure to wash cilantro thoroughly, as it may have some soil hidden among the leaves
Serving Idea:   Add half an egg salad sandwich and a glass of milk for a satisfying lunch.

Nutrients per serving:  Energy:  143 calories,  Fat  4.3 g, Saturated fat 0.7 g, Sodium 379 mg (16 %DV)  Carbohydrate 21 g, Fibre  6  g (24 % DV),   Protein: 7  g,  Calcium 43 mg (4%DV)  Iron  1.2 mg (9% DV),  High in Vitamin A, C and Folate